<table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0" ><tr><td valign="top" style="font: inherit;"><DIV>In his latest post Dr. Ledyard noted, "In the course of the 2003 discussion, it was  <BR>pointed out that the classical kasa poet Pak Illo (pen name Nogye,  1561-1642) used the form "Han[x]nim" (where [x] equals the now obsolete hangeul letter "arae a"), in a kasa. Unfortunately, Pak's poetic works were not printed until 1800. But that edition has proven very difficult to find; it is certainly not available in the U.S. His descendants put out what they termed a reprint of it in 1904, but that comes well after the otherwise first known appearance of hananim/haneunim in the early 1880s. It was the consensus back in 2003 that his usage of Hananim/Haneunim made more sense in his poetic context as a<BR>personification of Heaven than as a reference to a transcendent  monotheistic deity. But this particular issue needs more
 serious study by scholars of Choseon dynasty poetry."</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>I would just add that there are two occurences in Pak's <EM>kasa,</EM> one in his<EM> T'aep'yo^ng-sa</EM>  and the other in <EM>Nogye-ga</EM>.  In the former the line is <EM>ch'o^n'unsunhwan u^l aopkeda </EM></DIV>
<DIV><EM>ha'n*nim'a . </EM><FONT face=Ÿ size=2>In this case ha'n*nim'a is a vocative which Yi Sang-bo (whose <EM>Kaego Pak No-gye yo^n'gu </EM>was a key resource in my doctoral dissertation on No-gye's <EM>sijo</EM>) rendered in modern <SPAN class=yshortcuts id=lw_1217530326_0 style="CURSOR: hand; BORDER-BOTTOM: #0066cc 1px dashed">Korean</SPAN> as <EM>ha'nu*l u^i unsuga tol'au^m'u^l al ko^s'iomnida</EM>".  The latter occurence in Pak's Nogye-ga reads: "ilsaeng ae p'um'un stu^s u^l piomn*da ha'n*'nim'a" in which "stu^s u^l" was a Middle Korean rendering of "ttu^s u^l" and which Yi Sang-bo translated as "han p'yo^ngsaeng e p'um u^n ttu^s u^l piomnida. Ha'nu^nim iyo^."</FONT></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>Gari Ledyard is correct to point out that no known edition of the <EM>Nogye-jip</EM> prior to 1800 exists. There are four pre-modern editions of the text, three woodblock and one hand-written.  The woodblock editions all appear to have been made from one set of carved woodblocks, although there are a few minor differences with regard to a poem, <EM>Tosan-ga in them</EM>. The version I used from the Harvard-Yenching Library collection indicated that its blocks were carved in 1800, but that the edition was printed in 1904.  <BR><BR></DIV>
<DIV id=RTEContent>
<DIV id=RTEContent>
<DIV id=RTEContent>
<DIV id=RTEContent>
<DIV id=RTEContent>
<DIV id=RTEContent>
<DIV>
<DIV>
<DIV>
<DIV>
<DIV>
<DIV>
<DIV>
<DIV>Dr. Edward D. Rockstein <BR>Senior Language Instructor <BR>Language Learning Center (LLC) <BR>Office 410-859-5672</DIV>
<DIV>Fax 410-859-5737 <BR>ed4linda@yahoo.com <BR>  </DIV>
<DIV class=MsoNormal></DIV>
<DIV class=MsoBodyText><SPAN class=body style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold; COLOR: rgb(64,0,127); FONT-STYLE: italic">"<A title="Click for further information about this quotation" href="http://www.quotationspage.com/quote/35950.html" target=_blank rel=nofollow>I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it.</A> <FONT color=#000000> "  <FONT face="comic sans ms" size=1>Thomas Jefferson</FONT></FONT></SPAN></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV><BR></td></tr></table><br>