<div dir="ltr"><font color="#000000" size="3" face="Times New Roman">

</font><p style="margin:0cm 0cm 10pt"><font color="#000000"><font face=" "><b><span lang="EN-US">Jul
4, 2013, Koreanstudies Digest, Vol 121, Issue 12</span></b><span lang="EN-US">, <b>Dr. Carolin Dunkel</b></span></font></font></p><font color="#000000" size="3" face="Times New Roman">

</font><p style="margin:0cm 0cm 10pt"><font face=" "><font color="#000000"><span lang="EN-US">In fact, there is a discussion in German
libraries about changing the romanization system from McCune-Reischauer to a
more comfortable system. (Maybe the one that was suggested by the Korean
government in 1959.) The reason is that we are looking for a romanization that
could be done automatically.<b> ----[<i>Italicized part by Sang-Oak Lee:</i> <i>This is partly possible even with RR 2000
since I, as one of six members in the 1999 committee, insisted to insert</i> </b>(8)
When it is necessary to convert Romanized Korean back to Hangeul in special
cases such as in academic articles, Romanization is done according to Hangeul
spelling and not pronunciation. Each Hangeul letter is Romanized as explained
in section 2 except that </span><span lang="EN-US">, </span><span lang="EN-US">, </span><span lang="EN-US">, </span><span lang="EN-US"> are always written as g, d, b, l. When </span><span lang="EN-US"> has no sound value, it is replaced by a hyphen may also be used
when it is necessary to distinguish between syllables. <b><i>In terms of</i></b> ‘<b><i>assimilation’
which is applied in 2000, however, 1959 is closer to mechanical transliteration
excluding assimilation.</i>]</b></span></font></font></p><font color="#000000" size="3" face="Times New Roman">

</font><p style="margin:0cm 0cm 10pt"><b><span lang="EN-US"><font color="#000000" face=" "> </font></span></b></p><font color="#000000" size="3" face="Times New Roman">

</font><p style="margin:0cm 0cm 10pt"><b><span lang="EN-US"><font color="#000000"><font face=" ">4
Jul 2013, Koreanstudies Digest, Vol 121, Issue 14, From: don kirk</font></font></span></b></p><font color="#000000" size="3" face="Times New Roman">

</font><p style="margin:0cm 0cm 10pt"><span lang="EN-US"><font color="#000000"><font face=" ">"Choi" for Chae or Jae</font></font></span></p><font color="#000000" size="3" face="Times New Roman">

</font><p style="margin:0cm 0cm 10pt"><b><i><font color="#000000"><font face=" "><span lang="EN-US">[Choi 88.51%, <span> </span>Choe 10.20%, <span> </span>Choy 0.24%, --- Chae 0.09%, --- no J--. (p.184
in my report, </span>“<span lang="EN-US">The Romanization of Korean Surnames”
published by the Ministry of Culture.) It shows Korean people with this surname
have chosen Choi customarily without any logical reason like Lee.]</span></font></font></i></b></p><font color="#000000" size="3" face="Times New Roman">

</font><p style="margin:0cm 0cm 10pt"><span lang="EN-US"><font color="#000000" face=" "> </font></span></p><font color="#000000" size="3" face="Times New Roman">

</font><p style="margin:0cm 0cm 10pt"><b><span lang="EN-US"><font color="#000000"><font face=" ">7
Jul 2013, Koreanstudies Digest, Vol 121, Issue 15, Prof. Boudewijn Walraven</font></font></span></b></p><font color="#000000" size="3" face="Times New Roman">

</font><p style="margin:0cm 0cm 10pt"><span lang="EN-US"><font color="#000000"><font face=" ">Recommendation rather than prescription
would be my preference.</font></font></span></p><font color="#000000" size="3" face="Times New Roman">

</font><p style="margin:0cm 0cm 10pt"><b><span lang="EN-US"><font color="#000000"><font face=" ">[<i>Korean government is in between these two
but many people ask to prescribe it to avoid any rejection of entry among the
same family members in the foreign airport because of different romaninzation</i>.]
<span> </span></font></font></span></b></p><font color="#000000" size="3" face="Times New Roman">

</font><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>̻ Sang-Oak Lee/<a href="http://www.sangoak.com">www.sangoak.com</a><br>Prof. Emeritus, Dep't of Korean<br>College of Humanities, Seoul Nat'l Univ.<br>Seoul 151-745, Korea<br>
</div>