[KS] Korean vocalizing

DEBERNIERE JANET TORREY djt188 at psu.edu
Tue Jul 27 09:00:59 EDT 2010


Dear Jonathan,

Perhaps you are speaking of the custom of yelling "Yaho!" and other such
exclamations
while hiking. Here is an interesting Chosun.com blog about a campaign to stop
such 
shouting in the mountains because of the effect it has on wild animals who are
often 
startled by such sudden shouts. 
http://blog.chosun.com/blog.log.view.screen?blogId=5972&logId=65582
Apparently it's prevalent enough to necessitate such a campaign.
The writer mentions that hikers engage in this yelling because it's supposed to 
strengthen one's "hoyeonjigi (호연지기 浩然之氣)." I'm not an expert,
but I believe 
that hoyeonjigi (Ch. hao-ran-zhi-qi) has various meanings in East Asian 
philosophy: a sort of energy that lies between heaven and earth; moral courage;
an attitude
of freedom, etc. The writer also mentions that "Yaho!" was imported from
Switzerland, 
where something similar was shouted in the Alps, and that in Korea, it's become
a sort
of symbol of hoyeonjigi. I don't know how accurate any of this is, but it might
offer some
directions for further research on the topic. 

Best,

Deberniere T.



Date: Sun, 25 Jul 2010 20:33:55 -0400
From: "Jonathan Kramer" <jonathan_kramer at ncsu.edu>
To: <koreanstudies at koreaweb.ws>
Subject: [KS] Korean vocalizing
Message-ID: <4C4C9FB30200006E0003DB84 at gw.ncsu.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII

Dear Listserve members,  When I served a Fulbright in ROK in the mid-'90s, I
noted a practice among (usually) older Koreans who, while hiking in
the mountains, would loudly vocalize or shout.  It seemed to be some kind of
artful or health-giving practice.  Does anyone have information about this?  Is
there a name for it?  How prevalent is this practice?  Any information would be
appreciated.  jk

Jonathan C. Kramer, Ph.D.
Dept. of Music
Box 7311, NCSU
Raleigh, NC  27695
919-515-7952
919-515-4204 (fax)



------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Mon, 26 Jul 2010 07:20:57 +0000
From: liora donskoy <umsinai at hotmail.com>
To: <koreanstudies at koreaweb.ws>
Subject: Re: [KS] Korean vocalizing
Message-ID: <SNT114-W4988774B61CE8954EDB7FEABA60 at phx.gbl>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1255"


Dear Jonathan,

 

The hikers that you heard might have been practicing amateur p'ansori.  You can
find more information about this art in the wonderful book

Voices from the Straw Mat: Toward an Ethnography of Korean Story Singing, by
Chan E. Park. Hawai?i: University of Hawai?i Press, 2003 .

 

This link takes you to a review that appeared in Acta Koreana

http://koreaweb.ws/ks/ksr/ksr06-13.htm

 

You can also watch a version of it in the film: Sopyonje (Seopyeonje)
(1993) 

 

Best wishes,

Liora Sarfati

 

 

> Date: Sun, 25 Jul 2010 20:33:55 -0400
> From: jonathan_kramer at ncsu.edu
> To: koreanstudies at koreaweb.ws
> Subject: [KS] Korean vocalizing
> 
> Dear Listserve members, When I served a Fulbright in ROK in the mid-'90s,
I noted a practice among (usually) older Koreans who, while hiking in
the mountains, would loudly vocalize or shout. It seemed to be some kind of
artful or health-giving practice. Does anyone have information about this? Is
there a name for it? How prevalent is this practice? Any information would be
appreciated. jk
> 
> Jonathan C. Kramer, Ph.D.
> Dept. of Music
> Box 7311, NCSU
> Raleigh, NC 27695
> 919-515-7952
> 919-515-4204 (fax)
> 

 		 	   		  
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